January 04, 2015


Take the GSA Census 2011 and let your GSA’s participation and needs in the safe schools movement be heard!

How many GSAs exist in the country? What do GSAs do? What do GSAs need?

We want to know and we need YOUR help!

• The first 2,000 GSAs to take the GSA Census will receive a packet of free GLSEN organizing materials
• All GSA Census participants will be entered in a raffle to win a www.glsenstore.org gift certificate

All GSA students and advisors/sponsors are welcome to take the GSA Census. The GSA Census defines GSA as an umbrella term used to refer to all student clubs that bring LGBT youth and allies together to work on creating safe and inclusive school environments (e.g., Gay-Straight Alliance, Gay-Straight-Transgender Alliance, Queer-Straight Alliance, Rainbow Club).

January 04, 2015


Have you started planning for Ally Week yet?

  • Register: Click here to register your participation. If you're one of the first few thousand, you'll get some free materials to support your participation.
  • Gather Information: Find resources to help you start your planning on www.allyweek.org.
  • Find Support: Discuss your participation with the advisor of your GSA or student club, or another trusted faculty member. It’s a good idea to print out resources from www.allyweek.org to give to potential supportive faculty.
  • Get Permission: Your Ally Week is likely to be more successful if the school approves of your activities. Research and follow the proper protocol for approving an activity at your school. Ask your supportive staff member to help.
  • Build a Team: Find peers who want to contribute. Talk to members of your GSA and/or other allies. Tell them about Ally Week and ask if they would be interested in getting involved. Make sure to check out the resources about building coalitions at www.allyweek.org.
  • Schedule for next week: Make sure to schedule a Team meeting with your supportive faculty member and interested students for the upcoming week to keep making progress!
January 04, 2015

Sixteen-year-old Chase Stein is a GLSEN Student Ambassador recently profiled for leading safer schools organizing efforts in Southeast Michigan. Chase is noted for spearheading an exciting new project in the region.

The Breaking the Silence Initiative focuses on the following:

The Breaking the Silence Initiative is a service learning project that will target the reduction of bullying and the improvement of school climate for K - 12 students by training a core group of youth representatives to develop and implement experiential anti-bullying lessons. We will not only be visiting schools in person, we will also create multimedia and social media campaigns that provide opportunities for student advocacy and leadership within our region while making our message available nationwide.

The initiative is a part of the local GLSEN chapter in Southeast Michigan. Chase serves as the chapter's youth coordinator responsible for coordinating training and workshops for other student leaders.
Chase co-wrote the grant that earned the GLSEN chapter $28,000 in funding from the State Farm Youth Advisory to underwrite the initiative's activities. The Board was established in 2006 and has funded more than $16.9 Million to youth-led service-learning projects. State Farm estimates its funding has affected an estimated 10.1 million people.
In addition to co-organizing a 1-day summit, the GLSEN chapter will select 12 local high-school students to serve in leadership roles. These student leaders will then lead local teams to conduct anti-bullying workshops throughout the area.
Congratulations to Chase and everyone a part of these organizing efforts in Southeast Michigan!

January 04, 2015

Nearly half a century ago, Alabama Governor George Wallace stood in a schoolhouse door and told U.S. Justice Department officials that his state Constitution forbade two black students from entering. With a little coaxing from the National Guard, Governor Wallace stood down and the students were admitted.

Today, Governor Robert Bentley symbolically stands in front of school doors across the state telling thousands of students that they, too, are unwelcome in Alabama schools, this time because of their immigration status.

Time and time again, courts have found that the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution gives the federal government final authority over immigration matters in this country. In 1982, the Supreme Court ruled that states cannot deny a free public education to undocumented immigrants.

Yet earlier this year, Alabama passed the so-called Beason-Hammon Alabama Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act, ordering school officials to track the immigration status of students and their parents. On September 29, when a federal judge allowed the law to go into effect, over 2,000 Alabama students were pulled out of school overnight.

Parents feared that school administrators and employees would suddenly act as immigration agents resulting in the exodus.

Fortunately, a federal judge has temporarily enjoined the portion of the Beason-Hammon Act which would require public schools to determine the immigration status of students, but several other equally damaging aspects of the law remain in effect.

In the wake of the Beason-Hammon Act coming into effect, the U.S. Justice Department Justice Department officials are monitoring for bullying incidents linked to the law. According to Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Thomas Perez, the Department has heard a number of reports of increases in bullying across Alabama.

Ironically, efforts are currently being made to pass an enumerated anti-bullying bill in Alabama that would protect students from bullying, harassment, and intimidation based on race, sex, religion, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity. GLSEN strongly supports these efforts and commends Alabama state Rep. Patricia Todd on the introduction of this bill.

At the same time, it is very unfortunate that the Beason-Hammon Act is countering efforts to make Alabama schools safer.

What all children—regardless of immigration status—need to succeed is an education in a safe and supportive environment. Over time, this nation has made a great deal of progress toward making sure each child receives just that. It is unfortunate that Alabama lawmakers would try to impede that progress.

One can only hope that this president’s Justice Department has the same success that President Kennedy’s did forty-eight years ago, and that 2,000 children in Alabama will be able to return to school.

January 04, 2015


Gossip blogger Perez Hilton recently held an amazing concert with 100% of the proceeds benefiting GLSEN.

On September 20, the "One Night In...New York City" event featured performances including Mary J. Blige, Boyz II Men, Iggy Azalea, Anjulie and Karmin throughout the night. You can watch a recap below:

But Perez Hilton has taken his generosity a step further and announced a new endeavor to once again benefit GLSEN.

Perez partnered up with ShoeDazzle to design two shoes as part of the company's "Celebrity Shoe Design Program for Charity."

Perez Hilton's first shoe named "Sparkle," is a black faux suede pump with silver stud detailing. The second one called "Shine" is a casual all gender metallic sneaker with stud embellishments and zipper detailing.

Both shoes will be available for purchase on November 11 exclusively at ShoeDazzle.

Perez has designated GLSEN as his charity of choice to receive 100% of the profits from both shoes.

"I'm especially thrilled that we are going to be able to raise money for my charity of choice this year, GLSEN - the Gay Lesbian & Straight Education Network. Their vital work is helping youth all over America! Buying some fierce shoes can do a lot of good too, and that's gonna make this holiday season truly faboosh!"

In addition, ShoeDazzle is presenting a further fundraising opportunity to first time clients, Perez Hilton fans and GLSEN supporters: $5 from any first time purchase on ShoeDazzle.com using the code PEREZ at checkout, beginning October 24 – November 15, will be donated to GLSEN as well.

ShoeDazzle is a leading online fashion brand delivering personalized monthly shoe, handbag and jewelry selections to members by its team of top celebrity stylists. The company, which was founded by Brian Lee, Robert Shapiro, MJ Eng, and Kim Kardashian, who serves as the site’s Chief Fashion Stylist, was launched in March 2009 and now boasts over one and a half million Facebook fans.

January 04, 2015


Blog Post on Michigan by Alison Gill, Public Policy Manager

Michigan has been deeply divided over the issue of anti-bullying legislation for more than 10 years. As one of only three states that have failed to enact any sort of anti-bullying protection for students, Michigan lacks vital legal protections which have been shown to make schools safer for all students. The main issue which has held up passage of an anti-bullying bill is whether or not the bill should include enumeration, or a specific listing of characteristics that are frequently the subject of bullying and harassment, such as race, disability, and sexual orientation.

Why is this such a hurdle? Well it isn’t a conflict about the best way to protect students. Research has continually shown that enumeration in anti-bullying laws is critical to ensure that all students are protected from bullying and harassment. Students who attend schools with policies that enumerate categories report less bullying and harassment, less absenteeism due to feeling unsafe, more teacher intervention, and greater reporting of incidents when they do occur. Enumeration provides teachers and other educators the tools they need to implement anti-bullying and harassment policies, which makes it easier for them to prevent bullying and intervene when incidents occur. So research shows its necessary, educators agree its necessary, and common sense demonstrates it’s necessary to name the behavior that you wish to prevent.

So why is it controversial to provide specific protection? The answer is simple: Because it might benefit LGBT students. Certain lawmakers would rather provide completely ineffective protections than specifically articulate that LGBT students should not be bullied.

Never has this been demonstrated so clearly as this week when the Michigan Senate passed SB 137, cruelly named “Matt’s Safe Schools Law.” While we had been expecting them to move forward with a generic, nonenumerated bill for some time, the bill the Michigan Senate actually passed is far worse. It actually creates an exception to the prohibitions based on “sincerely held religious belief(s) or moral conviction(s).” In other words, bullying is not allowed, unless you have a “religious” reason for doing so.

Let me ask you this: What possible religious reason could you have for tormenting another student?

A “religious” right to torture other students is not only unacceptable, it is absurd. Lawmakers, educators, even the father whose son this bill was named for have spoken out against this measure. Now Michigan House of Representatives needs to hear from you—Please, if you live in Michigan, call your representative and tell them not to support this terrible bill.

January 04, 2015

>Have you and all your friends registered? Whether you're going to be silent all day or just at lunch hour register your DOS observance at our sister site: StudentOrganizing.org.

Why register? Every person who registers with GLSEN's Student Organizing site shows that they are committed to safe schools. That number is an important way to demonstrate the great impact that the Day of Silence has in schools and communities across the country. It only takes a few moments to sign up and be counted and your registration can make a big difference.

As of today the Day of Silence will be observed in nearly 4000 schools April 17th. But we're still two weeks away. Let's get that number a whole lot higher.

Remember: Don’t just participate, REGISTER!

And don't forget to follow us on:

January 04, 2015

We got so many amazing submissions to the "What Does the Day of Silence Mean to You?" contest. Thank you all who submitted an entry to us! Your bravery, resilience, and determination is inspiring. Thank you all for making the Day of Silence such a tremendous event. Your voices are being heard. We are proud to announce the videos and written submissions that will be featured on the GLSEN Blog! Check back daily until the Day of Silence (4/20) to see the submissions!  

Featured Videos

-Alexander P. from San Diego, CA

-Amanda L. from Syosset, NY

-Arial P. from Hendersonville, TN

Featured Essays

-Rachel S. from Tucson, AZ

-Ilana K. from Rockville, MD

-Kristin J. from Silverdale, WA

Honorable Mentions (Video)

-Jackson G. from Gulfport, MS

-Alexander H. from Christmas, FL

Honorable Mentions (Written)

-Katie B. from Lebanon, IL

-Zachary C. from Pendleton, SC

-Teresa D. from Elmwood Park, IL

-Neal R. from Dauphin, PA

  Congratulations to the featured submissions! We are so thankful that you took the time to share you stories with us. Remember to visit the GLSEN Blog daily to watch and read the entries! Also, today is the last day of order your Day of Silence merchandise.  Make sure you order your materials in time!  

January 04, 2015

Here at GLSEN, we're always looking for the next big way to get the word out about the amazing work we do. Our newest tool is called a Spark, and it looks like this:


The Spark is an awesome way for us to highlight our work in a way that compels people to take action, which is always super important! GLSEN couldn't make such a big difference without an energized supporter base working hard across the country. This could not have come at a better time, as GLSEN is now in the running to win $1 million in the Chase American Giving Awards! Through the widget, you can watch a video where Eliza describes GLSEN's important work, follow our Twitter feed, sign up for our email list, and vote for us in the Chase American Giving Awards. There are a ton of easy ways you can help make schools safer for LGBT students by using this Spark! You can embed the player on your personal website, blog or Tumblr by clicking on the "Share" button on the Spark and copying the embed code. You can also add the Spark to your Facebook or Twitter by clicking on their respective buttons. If you haven't yet, you can always vote for GLSEN on Chase's Facebook page, and Chase card holders can vote a second time at ChaseGiving.com. This last part is super exciting: you only have to embed the Spark once to get constantly updated content from GLSEN. After the Chase Awards end, we'll be updated the Spark with new content and new calls to action on a regular basis, without you having to do a thing! Please share this cool new tool with your friends, and let's keeping working to make safe schools for ALL students in America.    

January 04, 2015

When the lights came back on after GLSEN's screening of How to Survive a Plague last month, everyone in the room knew they'd seen a special film. We weren't the only ones impressed, apparently, as the movie received an Oscar nomination today for Best Documentary. How to Survive a Plague is one of the best documentaries I've ever seen, and I couldn't be more excited to see it receive national recognition. The film follows two coalitions, ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group), through the HIV/AIDS crisis during the late '80s and early '90s. The groups used political activism and civil disobedience to help shift AIDS from a near-certain death sentence to a manageable, but still serious, disease. Eliza Byard, our executive director, noted the connection between the atmosphere of the era and the birth of GLSEN: "My mother attended a founding meeting for GLSEN's New York City chapter at the time," she said, "walking through one of the very ACT UP meetings depicted in the film to a boiler room off the back where Kevin Jennings was greeting volunteers." How to Survive a Plague will compete with 5 Broken Cameras, The Gatekeepers, The Invisible War, and Searching for Sugar Man for the award. If you're interested in other documentaries about the HIV/AIDS crisis, check out We Were Here, which focuses on San Francisco, and  30 Years From Here, which reflects on three decades of HIV/AIDS in the US. Congratulations again to the director/producer David France and everyone else connected with the film!  


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