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No Name-Calling Week Poster

OVERVIEW
This lesson is designed to help students work together to create no name‐calling messages. Students will discuss various types of name‐calling situations and develop messages to discourage such language. Students then work alone or in groups to create posters displaying these messages. Posters will be placed in the classroom or throughout the school.

OBJECTIVES
Students will be able to identify instances of name‐calling and bullying in school.
Students will be able to design no name‐calling posters.
Students will be able to identify strategies to foster an atmosphere free of name‐calling.

AGE/EXPERIENCE LEVEL
Grades K-5.

THINGS TO PREP & TOOLS NEEDED
Poster board, blank paper (both standard and large), construction paper, pencils, paint,
markers, crayons, scissors, glue.

TIME
35-60 minutes.

PART 1 – INTRODUCTION/ DISCUSSION (5-10 MINUTES)
Goal: Students will be introduced to the lesson and begin discussing name‐calling.
Preparation: Have students sit in a comfortable group setting such as a circle or half circle. If
class already has ground rules, review them or quickly create some, e.g. respect each other, speak one at a time and so on.
Activity: Begin by letting students know that during this lesson they will create a no
name‐calling poster to be displayed in the classroom or school. Lead students in a guided
discussion around name‐calling in their schools.

Suggested questions and possible answers:

  • What is name‐calling?
  • Calling someone names with the intention to hurt, offend or isolate them
  • Where in school does this happen?
  • The classroom, hallways, gym, lunchroom, playground/recess
  • What are some ways you could stop name‐calling?
  • What could you say to someone who is name‐calling?

PART 2 – INDIVIDUAL/GROUP PLANNING (10–15 MINUTES)
Goal: Students will develop their no name‐calling messages and brainstorm poster ideas.
Activity: Have students either individually or in small groups (3 – 5), brainstorm messages that would prevent students from name‐calling and write their ideas on paper. Ask students to think about what they just discussed as a class about name‐calling while brainstorming. After students have their messages, have them plan what their posters will look like by sketching out some ideas.

PART 3 – IMPLEMENTATION (15-25 MINUTES)
Goal: Students will create their no name‐calling posters.
Activity: Have students either individually or in small groups create their no name‐calling posters. Suggest to them that posters could be area specific and could display where name‐ calling takes place. How would a message/poster differ for the lunchroom than the classroom? Students can use area‐specific scenery in their posters, claiming this space as a name‐calling free zone. Encourage students to be creative with their posters, using a variety of colors, mediums and visuals. Posters should draw other students’ attention while at the same time, being clear and easy to understand.

PART 4 – CLOSING (5-10 MINUTES)
Goal: Students will share their posters with the class and posters will be displayed.
Activity: Display student’s posters in the classroom or other parts of the school. If time allows,
ask students to stand up in front of the class and show their poster. Have them explain why they
chose their message and what the imagery means. Ask them to say how they think their poster
could have an impact on name‐calling in their school. Display the posters in the school.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIFFERENTIATION
Kindergarteners may want to make one poster as a class. Students could each be given a small piece of paper to draw a symbol of kindness that gets added to a larger poster from the class. Younger students or students who need more support can be given a blank paper to design their poster first before being given a larger poster. Students who need a challenge can work on presenting their poster to the grade or at a No Name-Calling Week assembly.

FOLLOW-UP/EXTENSIONS
These posters can be brought to different areas of the school as reminders for students in those spaces. Guidelines and activities can be created that reference the poster and the message that it represents. Presentations can be done by the students in those areas for the rest of the school to share the message of respect and its importance at school.

OTHER LESSONS TO EXPLORE
Building a Bully-Free School, Blow the Whistle on Name-Calling.